ZIYAH GAFIĆ, PHOTOGRAPHER

  • Muslims of New York

  • Muslims of New York
    Brief look in life of diverse Muslim comunity in greater NYC area

    client: TIME magazine, USA and D della REPUBBLICA, Italy

  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: Girls at the Bosnian mosque Ali Pasha, May 2007 in Queens, New York. Numbering an estimated 800,000 and counting, Muslims now represent one of the fastest growing religious communities in New York City. Through decades of immigration and conversion, Muslim New Yorkers constitute a vibrant mosaic of ethnic, racial, sectarian and socioeconomic diversity. Like other minority groups, however, Muslims also face a host of social, economic, and political challenges. To date, very little research exists about this important population. New York City's large Muslim population has increasingly attached more importance to their religious rather than ethnic identity since 9/11. The experience of heightened visibility following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 has caused many Muslims in New York City to attach greater importance to their religious background and less importance to the ethnic, linguistic and sectarian differences that have historically divided them.
  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: Schoolchildren from AICC pose for a group photo before a picnic on the Staten Island beach May 2007 in New York. Albanian Islamic Cultural Centre (AICC) at Staten Island was established in 1973. It is a three floor structure that provides huge and modern praying space but also a school following US school curriculum including Islamic studies. Islamic schools in USA are following same curriculum as other US schools with addition of Arabic language, study of holy Qoran and Islamic tradition. AICC is also one of the biggest masjids in America. Albanian community largely belongs to so called old immigration dating back to 70's when ethnic Albanians from Albania and former Yugoslavia immigrated to USA counting nearly 50 000 only in New York state. The second wave of immigration happened in late 90?s during the war in Kosovo when large group of Kosovars left their homeland.
  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: Children get on the schoolbus at the Albanian Islamic Culutral Centrer, May 2007 in Staten Island, New York. Albanian Islamic Cultural Centre (AICC) at Staten Island was established in 1973. It is an overwhelming three floor structure that provides huge and modern praying space but also a school following US school curriculum including Islamic studies. Islamic schools in USA are following same curriculum as other US schools with addition of Arabic language, study of holy Qoran and Islamic tradition. AICC is also one of the biggest masjids in America. Albanian community largely belongs to so called old immigration dating back to 70's when ethnic Albanians from Albania and former Yugoslavia immigrated to USA counting nearly 50 000 only in New York state. The second wave of immigration happened in late 90?s during the war in Kosovo when large group of Kosovars left their homeland.
  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: Collective prayer at Islamic Circle of North America masjid May 2007 in New York, New York. Numbering an estimated 800,000 and counting, Muslims now represent one of the fastest growing religious communities in New York City. Through decades of immigration and conversion, Muslim New Yorkers constitute a vibrant mosaic of ethnic, racial, sectarian and socioeconomic diversity. Like other minority groups, however, Muslims also face a host of social, economic, and political challenges. To date, very little research exists about this important population. New York City's large Muslim population has increasingly attached more importance to their religious rather than ethnic identity since 9/11. The experience of heightened visibility following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 has caused many Muslims in New York City to attach greater importance to their religious background and less importance to the ethnic, linguistic and sectarian differences that have historically divided them.
  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: Friday prayer at the Islamic Center, May 2007, in the Bronx, New York. Friday prayer is the most important prayer, equivalent to Christian Sunday mass. Numbering an estimated 800,000 and counting, Muslims now represent one of the fastest growing religious communities in New York City. Through decades of immigration and conversion, Muslim New Yorkers constitute a vibrant mosaic of ethnic, racial, sectarian and socioeconomic diversity. Like other minority groups, however, Muslims also face a host of social, economic, and political challenges. To date, very little research exists about this important population. New York City's large Muslim population has increasingly attached more importance to their religious rather than ethnic identity since 9/11. The experience of heightened visibility following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 has caused many Muslims in New York City to attach greater importance to their religious background and less importance to the ethnic, linguistic and sectarian differences that have historically divided them.
  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: Scenes from Albanian Islamic Culutral Center May 2007 in Staten Island, New York. Albanian Islamic Cultural Center (AICC) at Staten Island was established in 1973. It is an overwhelming three floor structure that provides huge and modern praying space but also a school following US school curriculum including Islamic studies. Islamic schools in USA are following same curriculum as other US schools with addition of Arabic language, study of holy Qoran and Islamic tradition. AICC is also one of the biggest masjids in America. Albanian community largely belongs to so called old immigration dating back to 70's when ethnic Albanians from Albania and former Yugoslavia immigrated to USA counting nearly 50 000 only in New York state. The second wave of immigration happened in late 90?s during the war in Kosovo when large group of Kosovars left their homeland. Today Albanian - Kosovars immigrants are among most homogenic and well organized ethnic communities in US also well known for its support to Kosovo cause.
  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: Labinsky Roach Falah, special educator with her friends Liz Nettleton, immigration paralegal, and Aaisha Shaikh, IT analyst, walk out of a restaurant for Sunday Brunch, May 2007 in New York City. Numbering an estimated 800,000 and counting, Muslims now represent one of the fastest growing religious communities in New York City. Through decades of immigration and conversion, Muslim New Yorkers constitute a vibrant mosaic of ethnic, racial, sectarian and socioeconomic diversity. Like other minority groups, however, Muslims also face a host of social, economic, and political challenges. To date, very little research exists about this important population. New York City's large Muslim population has increasingly attached more importance to their religious rather than ethnic identity since 9/11. The experience of heightened visibility following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 has caused many Muslims in New York City to attach greater importance to their religious background and less importance to the ethnic, linguistic and sectarian differences that have historically divided them.
  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: Khalid Latif (L) prepares to attend graduation day at NYU, May 2007 in New York City. Born and raised in Edison, New Jersey, Imam Latif was captain of his high school football and track teams, Student Council president, and one of only three Muslims in his graduating class. Imam Latif moved to New York City in 2000 to attend New York University and graduated with a bachelor with honors in political science and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies. It was during this time that he was exposed to a diverse array of Muslims from all over the world and for the first time was taught to really reflect on and embrace his Islam. In 2005 he was appointed as the first Muslim chaplain at NYU where he began to initiate his vision for a pluralistic future on and off campus for American Muslims. Imam Latif was also appointed as the first Muslim chaplain at Princeton University in 2006. Under his leadership, the Islamic Center at NYU became the first ever fully established Muslim student center at an institution of higher education in the United States. Imam Latif’s exceptional dedication and ability to cross interfaith and cultural lines on a daily basis brought him recognition throughout the city, so much so that in 2007 Mayor Michael Bloomberg nominated Imam Latif to become the youngest chaplain in history of the New York City Police Department at the age of 24. Through his work Imam Latif has demonstrated not only an exceptional dedication to gaining and disseminating religious knowledge and values, but has begun to carve out a much-needed space for young American Muslims to celebrate their unique identity and have their voices heard in the larger public sphere.
  • NEW YORK - MAY 2007: A small but growing population of Bosnian Muslims are buying property there and building a mosque, sports courts and ultimately an Islamic school. Numbering an estimated 800,000 and counting, Muslims now represent one of the fastest growing religious communities in New York City. Through decades of immigration and conversion, Muslim New Yorkers constitute a vibrant mosaic of ethnic, racial, sectarian and socioeconomic diversity. Like other minority groups, however, Muslims also face a host of social, economic, and political challenges. To date, very little research exists about this important population. New York City's large Muslim population has increasingly attached more importance to their religious rather than ethnic identity since 9/11. The experience of heightened visibility following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 has caused many Muslims in New York City to attach greater importance to their religious background and less importance to the ethnic, linguistic and sectarian differences that have historically divided them.

Copyright © 2017 by Ziyah Gafic. All rights reserved.
Design by Creative 24/7