ZIYAH GAFIĆ, PHOTOGRAPHER

  • The Coldest Place on Earth

  • OIMYAKON
    The coldest place on Earth
    Client: TELEGRAPH MAGAZINE, UK

  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: Reindeer breeding is the only source of income for nomadic inhabitants, known as Evens of the Republic of Sakha and Yakutia. With a diet consisting almost entirely of meat, they live in simple tents and follow the roaming reindeers. The only means of transport are reindeer dragged sleds. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: The typically Siberian home of retired Yegor Grigorievich Vinokurov. In Siberia, it is very common to decorate the home with wallpapers of pastoral landscapes. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: There is only one primary school in Oimyakon. The regulations say if the temperature drops below -53C the school closes. The pink room is the living space in the school where children, pictured, can watch TV and play. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: Albina Vinokurova, housewife in her kitchen/dinning room. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: Fishing and hunting is the main source of income for the average citizen of Oymiakon. Vladimir Atlasov spends most of his time fishing on mighty frozen river Indigirka near Oymiakon. It's an extremely hazardous profession due to many thermal sources that make holes in the otherwise thick ice. The fishermen quite literally spend most of their time on thin ice as these thermal areas are thin enough for them to drill through. The tent behind is erected to keep the heat from the stove and prevent the holes freezing over. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: Reindeer breeding is the only source of income for nomadic inhabitants, known as Evens of the Republic of Sakha and Yakutia. With a diet consisting almost entirely of meat, they live in simple tents and follow the roaming reindeers. The only means of transport are reindeer dragged sleds. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: A retired local bureaucrat who spends her time making statistics of the temperatures in Oimyakon. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: A high school student in Oymiakon photographed in the hall of the school. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: Reindeer breeding is the only source of income for nomadic inhabitants, known as Evens of the Republic of Sakha and Yakutia. With a diet consisting almost entirely of meat, they live in simple tents and follow the roaming reindeers. The only means of transport are reindeer dragged sleds. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.
  • OIMYAKON, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 2005: Pictured left is Mikhail Neustroyev's mother who is in charge of the house/tent. They use dogs to control reindeers. The dogs sleep in tent until they are 2 months old, but from there they sleep outdoors, on the snow. In the village of Oimyakon, nestled in a shallow mountain valley in far north-eastern Siberia, locals don't usually bother with the attribute 'minus' when talking about the weather. On January 25th 2005 the temperature fell to minus 62 degrees Celsius, marking the coldest day in a more or less average year. According to records, Oimyakon is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement on earth. In January 1926 meteorologists measured an air temperature of minus 71.2 degrees Celsius and with the temperature falling into the minus sixties every year, that makes the climate here one of the harshest in the world. Only the Antarctic has colder weather on record. The village is more than 200 miles south of the Arctic circle, but it's topography - it lies about six thousand feet up in the Verkhoyansk mountains - is what makes it so cold.

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